CHURCH FETE SILENT AUCTION

The Silent Auction is a very popular feature of the Fete (this Saturday 24th June from 12-4pm) and we have received some wonderful experiences and items including: A day return plane trip from Headcorn to Le Touquet for two; a day’s birdwatching with Charles Trollope; a signed England Rugby Shirt, and many more. Don’t forget to browse the full list and bid at the Fete!

CHURCH FETE

ALL THE FUN OF THE CHURCH FETE – 12-4pm on the Village Green
This year’s Fete promises to be a perfect afternoon for the whole family. It starts at 12:00 when the Bar-B-Q and Hop Inn will be serving lunch and drinks and the Ukulele Band serenades visitors. Afternoon teas will be served in the Church and on the top of the Green, and all afternoon you can eat delicious strawberries and cream between browsing the Plant, Bric-a-Brac, Jewellery, Chic Boutique, Cake, Tool and Book stalls. In the arena, watch Maypole dancing, Tug of War, and the Fun Dog Show.

CHURCH FETE on 24th June – DONATIONS REQUEST

CHURCH FETE on 24th June – DONATIONS REQUEST
If you have good condition donations for the raffle and the plant, bric-a-brac, jewellery, Chic Boutique and book Stalls, then please leave them under the gazebos at the Rectory. Thank you!

Raffle tickets can be purchased at the village shop “Benenden’s”.

Benenden Village Church Fete

BENENDEN VILLAGE CHURCH FETE – 24TH JUNE,
On the Village Green and starting earlier at midday until 4pm
While the children play in the Kid’s Corner, dance around the Maypole, ride ponies and bounce on the Bouncy Castle – you can browse the many stalls, explore the Classic Car Display, bid on the Silent Auction, sample the BBQ, Beer tent and a Cream Tea while listening to our talented Ukulele Band. New this year is the Fun Dog Show. More details soon…

Rector’s Letter – June 2017

Embrace opportunity

The Church may not change quickly but, down through the centuries, it has always embraced new technology, new ways of doing things – it just does so without rushing as so much of other society does. Examples of those changes made by previous generations in your parish church include: moving away from candles to electric light; larger windows and different stained glass images; also heating – who was the person who thought it might be a good idea to put some form of heating in the church? Or what about seating for all? Originally, there would have been very little seating in church. The stoup bowl, for crossing with holy water when entering the church, is over by the south door indicating this was probably the main entrance at one time. Or how about the building of a bell tower? I suspect the vast majority would not want to return to how everything was when our church was originally built.

We naturally continue to evolve – for all the church family: the young and the not so young. Recently, eight rear pews have been put into storage, under an Archdeacon’s Licence, to make the space at the back of church more flexible in its use. This was enjoyed by over a 100 people for a social after the Archdeacons’ Visitation service, and is enjoyed every week by families and children. I would encourage you to come and see; to come and use the space; and to embrace the opportunities that it can bring as we evolve.

Revd David Commander,
Rector

Rector’s Letter – May 2017

Can I make a difference?

I trust that everyone had a lovely Easter: enjoying all the services that were on offer; enjoying the break from school, work or your usual routine; perhaps you were fortunate enough to get away on holiday; or just enjoyed the lovely weather.

The Saturday of Easter, as I write this, feels quite a strange time. We’ve journeyed through Lent, Holy Week, the celebration of Maundy Thursday, and the darkness of Good Friday; and now we wait – waiting before the great celebrations of Easter day. Today there is the expectation of Easter Sunday, looking ahead to a wonderful, joyful time; but it is a day, for Christians, tempered with how we feel about Jesus being crucified. Easter Eve is not a happy day – and that is for us, who know there is good news to come. For the first followers, they did not know the wonderful next chapter of the story.

Then I put on the news – and it doesn’t relieve the mood of the day. I am finding the escalation of situations reported in the news quite disturbing; particularly given what we are told of the personalities involved in leadership on the world stage right now. The news involving the United States and Afghanistan, and Syria, and Russia, and North Korea is very concerning; what is going to happen tomorrow and next week, next month? Why do human beings always seem to have to be so aggressive, so dominating of others, so controlling? Why do human beings find it so hard to live with others who are different?

Right now, I feel like a helpless spectator on the sideline; being affected by what I’m watching, but unable to do anything to influence the outcome. Asking myself, “What can I do?” With situations like we have between the US and North Korea right now, the worrying answer is: absolutely nothing.

But … we can do something to make a difference in our little part of the world. We can do something to affect how life feels where we live and work; we can affect life in our community. We can start respecting other people. We can change the way we are with everyone that we meet or speak to. We can stop speaking about them behind their back. We can stop putting other people down. We can start respecting people who hold different views to our own. We can start caring for others, even when we disagree with them.

Human beings have a habit of escalating situations. We may not be able to affect the world stage, but each and every one of us can affect the community we live in. It starts with me; it starts with you. Can I make a difference? Yes, I can.

Revd David Commander, Rector

Rector’s Letter – April 2017

Celebrate this Easter – Christ is risen

Wow, isn’t this a beautiful time of year, but also such a busy time of year? So much to do outdoors as the garden comes back into colour and into life. No doubt there will be others planning on work inside the home too – as long lists of jobs are drawn up. In the last couple of letters I’ve encouraged folk to try and step back from all the ‘busyness’ that we inflict upon ourselves, and use this time of Lent to more quietly reflect on life – and on God.

In some ways though I am also saying, “Don’t do as I do; do as I would like to do” – for this is probably a priest’s busiest time of year: the run up to Palm Sunday, Holy Week and Easter. So as I encourage you to reflect and take some time out of the busyness, priests everywhere are ramping up preparing many services. And what a privilege it is to do this, for this is the most important time in the church year; reflecting through Lent, then ready for the joy of Easter.

Why not come and join us this year during Holy Week or on Easter Sunday? There is certainly a lot to choose from. We begin with the celebration of Palm Sunday (9 April): there is a breakfast served in the Memorial Hall between the 8am and 10am services; and a procession from the Memorial Hall to St George’s ready for the start of the 10am service. Then through Holy Week, there is Morning Prayer at 8am, and a Reflective service at 5pm in the Mission Church in Sandhurst or 7.30pm in St George’s on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Maundy Thursday there’s a service at the Cathedral at 11am, and a Communion service at St George’s, for the benefice, at 7.30pm. Good Friday (14 April) we have “An Hour at the Cross” service at 10am; on Holy Saturday, Easter Eve, there is another Reflective service at St George’s.

Then we have the joy and celebration of Easter Day! And it starts early in the benefice: come along to an outdoor service at St Nicholas Church, Sandhurst for a sunrise service starting at 5.40am! It is beautiful seeing the sun rise across the marshes as we begin celebrating Easter together. Then warm up with tea/coffee and a bacon butty at the Mission Church! We then move on to an 8am Communion, a 10am Eucharist, and finish off the celebrations with Messy Church at 4pm; like I said: choice, lots of choice!

Please do not be so busy this Easter time to miss out on the joy and celebration, and the beauty of this time of year. God, who loves you so much he sent his Son to die for you, raises his Son to life. Let’s celebrate that together. Happy Easter.

Revd David Commander, Rector