Church Fete thanks

A BIG thank you to everyone who worked so hard making the 2017 Church Fete such a huge success. To those who worked hard pulling it all together; those who helped set up and clear away; those who worked on stalls and sorted everything that was donated; those who provided us all with refreshments; those who worked behind the scenes; and those who came to the fete and enjoyed themselves. A great village event and a really enjoyable church event. Thank you all for your hard work.

Revd David.

New Director of Music

We are delighted to welcome Charlotte O’Neill as our Director of Music and also all her family to St. George’s. Charlotte lives with her husband Richard and their family in Hawkhurst; she is a Durham University graduate and has led choirs in her college there and at churches in Houston Texas, Frittenden and Maidstone. Charlotte led St. George’s Church choir for the first time at the July Choral Evensong service. We look forward to many happy and productive years with Charlotte and our choir.

Revd David.

Rector’s Letter – July 2017

Life is to be lived

I do confess to feeling a little election fatigue of late! (Scottish Independence Referendum, September 2014; a general election in May 2015; Brexit in June 2016; another general election – with a surprising result! – in June 2017; and local elections in that period too.) You remember Brenda from Bristol: “You’re joking – not another one! Honestly I can’t stand this.” Moreover, there is, of course, every prospect of another election in less than five years; people will start to moan about all this! However, just be grateful you live in a democracy and can enjoy having a choice.

In the same period, we have also had some surprising results in elections in other countries, one of which makes me concerned for the world’s future and stability. We have also witnessed, on our televisions, huge numbers of refugees travelling across parts of Africa and the Middle East entering Europe and trying to cross the channel to the UK. We have witnessed atrocities of innocent people being killed by IS. In the last three months, we have seen three terrorist attacks taking place in our country: on Westminster Bridge and in the grounds of Parliament; at a concert enjoyed by many youngsters in Manchester; and on London Bridge and Borough Market. In these, so many innocent people have lost their lives and many others will have to deal with physical injuries and mental anguish and pain for probably the rest of their lives. In these attacks, we have witnessed the worst of human behaviour, but we have also witnessed humanity at its very best. We have seen a few individuals carrying out senseless, violent, brutal, murderous acts; but we have seen many, many more people showing love, compassion and care to complete strangers. And today, as I write this, we have seen again love and compassion in the community in West London as people have reacted to the devastating fire in a tower block. In all of these events, we have seen selfless acts by so many members of the emergency services and the public.

Humanity at is best is so beautiful; humanity at its worst can be utterly shocking. In one quote I have read today from London, a Paul Kipulu said, “There is nothing here but love; and I wanted to help.” Oh that we could all take that attitude to living our lives, and it not take some tragedy to bring this out in us. All human life is valuable: whatever our culture, background, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, gender. I want to encourage you to live life; to enjoy life; to enjoy your family. None of us knows what is around the corner in our lives. So please, please – live in love. Life is too short, too fragile, too vulnerable, too precious to worry and argue about insignificant things. Life is to be lived and enjoyed – in harmony with everyone else.

Revd David Commander, Rector

CHURCH FETE SILENT AUCTION

The Silent Auction is a very popular feature of the Fete (this Saturday 24th June from 12-4pm) and we have received some wonderful experiences and items including: A day return plane trip from Headcorn to Le Touquet for two; a day’s birdwatching with Charles Trollope; a signed England Rugby Shirt, and many more. Don’t forget to browse the full list and bid at the Fete!

CHURCH FETE

ALL THE FUN OF THE CHURCH FETE – 12-4pm on the Village Green
This year’s Fete promises to be a perfect afternoon for the whole family. It starts at 12:00 when the Bar-B-Q and Hop Inn will be serving lunch and drinks and the Ukulele Band serenades visitors. Afternoon teas will be served in the Church and on the top of the Green, and all afternoon you can eat delicious strawberries and cream between browsing the Plant, Bric-a-Brac, Jewellery, Chic Boutique, Cake, Tool and Book stalls. In the arena, watch Maypole dancing, Tug of War, and the Fun Dog Show.

CHURCH FETE on 24th June – DONATIONS REQUEST

CHURCH FETE on 24th June – DONATIONS REQUEST
If you have good condition donations for the raffle and the plant, bric-a-brac, jewellery, Chic Boutique and book Stalls, then please leave them under the gazebos at the Rectory. Thank you!

Raffle tickets can be purchased at the village shop “Benenden’s”.

Benenden Village Church Fete

BENENDEN VILLAGE CHURCH FETE – 24TH JUNE,
On the Village Green and starting earlier at midday until 4pm
While the children play in the Kid’s Corner, dance around the Maypole, ride ponies and bounce on the Bouncy Castle – you can browse the many stalls, explore the Classic Car Display, bid on the Silent Auction, sample the BBQ, Beer tent and a Cream Tea while listening to our talented Ukulele Band. New this year is the Fun Dog Show. More details soon…

Rector’s Letter – June 2017

Embrace opportunity

The Church may not change quickly but, down through the centuries, it has always embraced new technology, new ways of doing things – it just does so without rushing as so much of other society does. Examples of those changes made by previous generations in your parish church include: moving away from candles to electric light; larger windows and different stained glass images; also heating – who was the person who thought it might be a good idea to put some form of heating in the church? Or what about seating for all? Originally, there would have been very little seating in church. The stoup bowl, for crossing with holy water when entering the church, is over by the south door indicating this was probably the main entrance at one time. Or how about the building of a bell tower? I suspect the vast majority would not want to return to how everything was when our church was originally built.

We naturally continue to evolve – for all the church family: the young and the not so young. Recently, eight rear pews have been put into storage, under an Archdeacon’s Licence, to make the space at the back of church more flexible in its use. This was enjoyed by over a 100 people for a social after the Archdeacons’ Visitation service, and is enjoyed every week by families and children. I would encourage you to come and see; to come and use the space; and to embrace the opportunities that it can bring as we evolve.

Revd David Commander,
Rector