Rector’s Letter – July 2017

Life is to be lived

I do confess to feeling a little election fatigue of late! (Scottish Independence Referendum, September 2014; a general election in May 2015; Brexit in June 2016; another general election – with a surprising result! – in June 2017; and local elections in that period too.) You remember Brenda from Bristol: “You’re joking – not another one! Honestly I can’t stand this.” Moreover, there is, of course, every prospect of another election in less than five years; people will start to moan about all this! However, just be grateful you live in a democracy and can enjoy having a choice.

In the same period, we have also had some surprising results in elections in other countries, one of which makes me concerned for the world’s future and stability. We have also witnessed, on our televisions, huge numbers of refugees travelling across parts of Africa and the Middle East entering Europe and trying to cross the channel to the UK. We have witnessed atrocities of innocent people being killed by IS. In the last three months, we have seen three terrorist attacks taking place in our country: on Westminster Bridge and in the grounds of Parliament; at a concert enjoyed by many youngsters in Manchester; and on London Bridge and Borough Market. In these, so many innocent people have lost their lives and many others will have to deal with physical injuries and mental anguish and pain for probably the rest of their lives. In these attacks, we have witnessed the worst of human behaviour, but we have also witnessed humanity at its very best. We have seen a few individuals carrying out senseless, violent, brutal, murderous acts; but we have seen many, many more people showing love, compassion and care to complete strangers. And today, as I write this, we have seen again love and compassion in the community in West London as people have reacted to the devastating fire in a tower block. In all of these events, we have seen selfless acts by so many members of the emergency services and the public.

Humanity at is best is so beautiful; humanity at its worst can be utterly shocking. In one quote I have read today from London, a Paul Kipulu said, “There is nothing here but love; and I wanted to help.” Oh that we could all take that attitude to living our lives, and it not take some tragedy to bring this out in us. All human life is valuable: whatever our culture, background, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, gender. I want to encourage you to live life; to enjoy life; to enjoy your family. None of us knows what is around the corner in our lives. So please, please – live in love. Life is too short, too fragile, too vulnerable, too precious to worry and argue about insignificant things. Life is to be lived and enjoyed – in harmony with everyone else.

Revd David Commander, Rector